Elf bonnet

For Christmas this year I made my wee cousin this sweet little elf hat.

The pattern is Pixielue by Paelas Knits. The instructions, which come translated into English from Norwegian, were a bit befuddling at times but it worked out fine. Paelas does so many more adorable knitting patterns for small people… 

The yarn is Rowan “alpaca colour” (made from baby alpaca!) that I picked up half price from The Wool Croft in Abergavenny (and the persimmon skein for the edging and pompom is the same stuff, but was a gift from someone many moons ago). 

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Mr Badger

Just look at these socks:

Why are they so weird? Very badgery, very spirally, very unexpected. The yarn is Rowan Fine Art, which is a sock wool, so presumably other people have had this problem too.

Anyway, I made them for my dad for Christmas, to have a little something under the tree since my main present was experiential (we saw the musical of The Lorax in Toronto!), and he seems to like them just fine. 

Let them eat brioche

This is the only Christmas gift I’ve made which I can post early as it’s for my 94-year-old Grannie, who even if she did read this post would forget it in a few hours. I’ve been quietly beavering away for months on all sorts of other things (to be revealed soon!). 

This is the first time I’ve knitted brioche stitch, and I really like it! So squishy and warm. I like how it turned out a bit like a candy cane, although I’m sure my Grannie would prefer purple! 

I vaguely followed this pattern from Purl Soho, but only cast on 120 stitches. Yarn is various leftover bits and bobs – some from this sweater, and some from one my mum made a few years ago. 

Boot socks

Note: WOW it’s been four months since I last posted, and this has been sitting in my drafts folder since November. I’ll publish this post and another from October (blushes), and then be free to move forwards into the third month of 2017!

It’s starting to get a bit chilly and that means it’s time for my dad’s birthday.

This year he got super warm, super practical boot socks.

I used the Hermione’s Everyday Socks free pattern on Ravelry, adapting it to the gauge and size I wanted. I like this pattern a lot – very easy to remember for commute knitting, and pleasing to look at and touch.

The main yarn is some old Rowan Purelife I found lying around and the cuffs, heels and toes are in a superwash  merino.

Baa-ble hat

After making Mr Donk  I had some yarn left over. I’ve admired Donna Smith’s Baa-ble Hat pattern for some time, so stocked up on extra colours of Rowan felted tweed DK and set to work. 

I adjusted the pattern for the thinner yarn by casting on 120 stitches in the first place, thereby neatly avoiding the increase at the top of the ribbing. 

I’m obsessed with these colours. My mum wants one too, but I’ll have to find new colour combinations. I think I’ll have a flock of these hats soon enough. 

Two for joy

I first blogged about this poor single sock in February 2015. I’m pleased to finally announce that it has a friend, its life is complete, it can fulfil its purpose in life. Two socks! At last! And they both more or less go over my foot.

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Sadly I finished the second sock just in time for summer, so I haven’t had an opportunity to wear them both together yet. But come autumn, I predict I shall be living in these. They’re so warm! So thick! So dense!

The pattern is from Georgina Parks’s excellent book for Rowan, Sock Knitting Workshop. It was a great pattern for learning fairisle techniques – easy to remember but great to look at.

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The yarns I used for these are potentially awkward bedfellows – the purple-blue is scrumptious Rowan Fine Art sock wool. The pink stuff was dirt cheap – only £1 at Tiger – and is fluffy and rough. But I think the combination looks good at least.

I chose the colours based on a really vivid dream I had when I was about four years old, about a beautiful pink and purple fish I saw walking (in my dream) with my dad through Toronto’s Chinatown. Twenty-two years later, here I am knitting a sock in its memory.

I think the afterthought heel is a bit of a problem in this pattern, because the fairisle just doesn’t have enough stretch to take it. Hence my difficulties with getting these socks on (and off). I have already lined up my next pair of socks to knit, using this Japanese pattern. They have a gusset, so I’m hopeful that the heel shaping will be marginally better.

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